Book Review: Don’t Believe In God Till You Experience Him

The title of Mukul Kumar’s Don’t Believe In God Till You Experience Him gives an idea that the book is a non-fictitious account of someone’s realization of God or almighty. However, that is far from the case. It’s a fiction novel which may be based on the author’s personal experiences to some extent. It portrays an extraordinary journey of an ordinary and poor village boy.

The story starts in the yesteryears in the small town of Rajgir in Bihar, India. Mukul is born in a joint family that is poor and constantly quarrelling. His mother is his father’s second wife. In those days, one was allowed to have more than one wife. She goes to Patna to continue her studies after marriage. Mukul also goes to stay with her to complete his education. Despite coming from a poor family, he scores very well in exams. He is hailed as a bright student.

Dont-Believe-in-God-bookBut once he enters college, he gets spoilt in the hostel life despite the strict atmosphere. He somehow manages to pass class 12 but doesn’t clear a single competitive exam to enter a premier engineering college. Mukul starts working for it and appears next year. He finally makes it to an engineering college. But at this moment, his life takes a sudden and unexpected turn. His perception and meaning towards life goes through a complete change.

Don’t Believe In God Till You Experience Him keeps you guessing about its main story for quite long, which isn’t a bad thing. The preface at the start appears more interesting later because almost 50% of the content, which follows, is poles apart from it. So, you keep wondering when the preface will find a place in the main plot. Although there are moments in the latter half of the book where the story drags, the final conclusion is impressive.

The book throws light on the menace of fake Godmen. But I personally could also relate to it from the point of view of politicians and their blind supporters.

The narrative is the major drawback here though. The book isn’t a fast read because the writing isn’t engaging enough. On most occasions, it appears bland during important turns. The balance between simple and rich language isn’t maintained. It tilts more towards the former thereby making it too simplistic. Also, few details about the protagonist’s everyday life could have been avoided.

Overall: Don’t Believe In God Till You Experience Him is worth reading due to its storyline.

Rating: 3/5

Author: Mukul Kumar

Review by: Keyur Seta

Price: Rs 275

Cover: Beautiful image of a sanyasin walking into enlightenment, although it’s quite similar to Hidden Road To Lifemanship by the same publishers

Pages: 265

Publishers: Leadstart Publishing